Phillip Cock

Phillip Cock, Australian Army veteran talking with a client. Phillip is wearing a black t-shirt. The back of the client’s head is visible, but her face is hidden.

Phil grew up in Bute, a small town in South Australia. He left school after Year 11 to work on the South Australian Railways. In 1980, at the age of 20, he got itchy feet and decided to join the Australian Army as an infantry soldier.

“My first posting was to a parachute battalion, so I certainly did my fair share of jumping out of perfectly good aircraft,” Phil said.

After 21 years, and postings all over Australia, Phil decided to leave the Army and transition to the Army Reserves.

“By then I had done everything I had set out to do in the Army, but was only 40, with a lot of living left to do. I would have loved to have had access to the advice, support and resources that are available for members today.”

Phil initially found employment in public service. He resigned after 7 years to have a go at running his own small business in the hospitality industry, which was a very tough gig.

Phillip Cock, Australian Army veteran sitting down at a table with a laptop computer. He is talking with a female client in a private meeting room. Phillip is wearing a black t-shirt and the client is wearing a black cardigan and patterned blouse.

In 2011, 10 years after his transition, Phil’s wife Amanda alerted him to a job advertisement for a ‘Transition Officer’ with the Department of Defence. He applied and won the position.

“I am employed as a Transition Coach and have been managing the ADF Transition Centre in South Australia for a couple of years now.”

“The Defence Force Transition Program has gone through a huge transformation in the last few years. We have moved from providing purely administrative assistance to providing each transitioning member with a qualified career development coach.

“This means we can now provide the tools transitioning members and their families need to reach their post-transition goals. Another change is that we now provide this support to members for up to 2 years after their transition.”

According to Phil, the most important aspect of a successful transition is being proactive.

Phillip Cock, Australian Army veteran sitting down at a table with a laptop computer. He is talking with a female client in a meeting room. Phillip is wearing a black t-shirt and the client is wearing a black cardigan. There are more chairs and tables in the background.

“Your ADF Transition Coach will guide you through the process and help you to connect to the Department of Veterans Affairs, Commonwealth Superannuation Corporation and other ex-service organisations who provide support to our members post-transition.

“Members and their families need to give themselves enough time to experience the full transition process. The more you can do while you are still in the ADF, the easier you will find your transition when the time comes.

“I love my job and I love helping current members transition to civilian life. One of the best feelings I get as a coach is when a transitioned member expresses their gratitude for the coaching and guidance they have received during this sometimes nerve-wracking time in their life.”

Thank you for your service, in and out of uniform, Phil.

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