Anzac Day — 25 April 2020

Anzac Day is a significant day for all Australians and is often a time for private reflection. 

17 April 2020

#AnzacAtHome

Anzac Day is a significant day for all Australians and is often a time for private reflection. While Anzac Day services have been cancelled overseas and across Australia, the day remains just as important.

The Department of Veterans’ Affairs encourages all Australians to pause and reflect on the service and sacrifice of the more than 102,000 Australians who have died in wars, conflicts and peacekeeping operations.

Australians are encouraged to privately commemorate Anzac Day, in-line with the latest health advice, and to watch the service at the Australian War Memorial. While the Service is not open to public attendance, the Service will be nationally broadcast on the ABC, to enable the public to watch from their own homes. There will also be a range of other commemorative activities that will be broadcast throughout the day — check your local guides for times.

However Australians choose to mark Anzac Day, they should do so in-line with the latest health advice and in a way that is solemn and dignified.

The Department has produced a range of resources that are available on our Anzac Portal to help you commemorate Anzac Day privately.

Marking the occasion

Australians are encouraged to privately commemorate Anzac Day, in line with the latest health and government advice, and to watch the service at the Australian War Memorial. While the service is not open to public attendance, the service will be broadcast nationally on the ABC, to enable the public to watch from their own homes. There will also be a range of other commemorative activities that will be broadcast throughout the day — check your local guides for times.

However Australians choose to mark Anzac Day, they should do so in line with the latest health advice and in a way that is solemn and dignified.

What you can do to mark Anzac Day at home this year

  1. Watch the Australian War Memorial Service at Dawn — check your local guides for times.
  2. Hold your own private commemorations — ensure they are solemn, dignified and in line with the latest health advice.
  3. Your state or territory government or RSL Branch might have planned a private ceremony — check your local guides or their social media channels for times and to see if it will be livestreamed online or broadcast by the ABC.
  4. Tune in to the ABC or media across the country and pause at 11.30am AEST (which is 4.30am in Gallipoli) for a moment of personal reflection. This time broadly represents the landings at Gallipoli at dawn on 25 April 1915.
  5. Join the conversation on social media by using #AnzacAtHome #AnzacDay2020 #Anzacspirit #showyourmedals
  6. Download our social media graphics — such as banner images and social media tiles.
  7. Ask about your family’s military history:
    • Visit the Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Australian War Memorial or National Archives of Australia websites.
    • Ancestry.com.au will be making access to military records free from 21-26 April.
  8. Download the ‘Anzac 360’ App from the Apple store or Google Play.
  9. Download the Department’s ‘Anzac Day 2020’ Spotify playlist.
  10. Check in on mate or family member — Anzac Day can be an emotional time for many veterans, so now is the perfect time to pick up the phone and give them a call and reconnect with a veteran.

These are just some tips to get you started, but if you are looking at what else you could do on Anzac Day, or even throughout April, then visit the ‘Personal Commemorations’ page on our Anzac Portal — anzacportal.dva.gov.au/anzacathome.

See also: https://www.dva.gov.au/recognition/events-and-reminders-all-who-served/commemorative-services/anzac-day-2020