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Repatriation Commission Annual Report 2017–18

Craftsmen at work at the Repatriation Artificial Limb Appliance Centre in 1961.

Craftsmen at work at the Repatriation Artificial Limb Appliance Centre in 1961.

This image depicts Mr JC Appleton, survivor of the sinking of HMAS Canberra, using a lathe at the Caulfield Repatriation Hospital artificial limb factory to create prosthetics for other amputees, 1946.

Mr JC Appleton, survivor of the sinking of HMAS Canberra, uses a lathe at the Caulfield Repatriation Hospital artificial limb factory to create prosthetics for other amputees, 1946. Over the past century, the techniques and materials used for prosthetics have undergone dramatic changes, and current appliances are a vast improvement on those first supplied at the end of the First World War. (AWM 131242)

  • Functions and powers

    The Repatriation Commission was established on 1 July 1920 by proclamation of the Australian Soldiers’ Repatriation Act 1920.

  • Structure

    The Repatriation Commission has three full-time members appointed by the Governor-General: the President, Deputy President and Services member.

  • Membership

    Liz Cosson AM CSC, President | Craig Orme DSC AM CSC, Deputy President | Major General Mark Kelly AO DSC, Commissioner.

  • Relationship with DVA

    The Repatriation Commission is responsible for the general administration of the VEA, with administrative support provided by DVA.

  • Administration of the VEA

    The Repatriation Commission has broad powers to enable it to carry out its functions and duties under the VEA.

  • Repatriation Commission activity

    In 2017–18 the Repatriation Commission held 12 formal meetings and considered 55 submissions.

  • DVA celebrates 100 years of repatriation

    As part of the celebration, DVA published 'Repat' — A concise history of repatriation in Australia by Professor Philip Payton of Flinders University.