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Factsheet IS58 - Qualifying Service in Post-Second World War Conflicts

Purpose

This Factsheet explains qualifying service for Australian, Commonwealth and allied veterans who served in conflicts following the Second World War.

An Australian veteran with qualifying service may be eligible for the service pension and other associated benefits. Commonwealth and allied veterans who meet the relevant criteria may be eligible to receive the service pension.

What is qualifying service?

Qualifying service is defined in the Veterans’ Entitlements Act 1986 (VEA) and is one of the criteria used to determine if you are eligible for a service pension. Qualifying service for a service pension is different from operational service for disability pension purposes. It is possible to be eligible for a disability pension, but not be eligible for a service pension.

For an Australian post-World War 2 veteran, qualifying service is:

  • certain specified service in minesweeping and bomb-disposal operations; and for which certain medals or clasps were awarded; or
  • allotment to and service in the operational area as described in Schedule 2 of the VEA during the specified period; or
  • assignment to and service on a post-Second World War deployment which has been declared to be warlike service by the Minister for Defence; or
  • service on certain submarine special operations during the period 1978 to 1992.

For a person who served as a member of a defence force established by a Commonwealth country, qualifying service is service during a period of hostilities either:

  • in an area and at a time when you incurred danger from hostile forces of the enemy outside the country in whose defence force you served; or
  • within the country of enlistment for which you received, or were eligible to receive, a campaign medal.

*Note: - A Commonwealth country is a country (other than Australia) that is, or was at the time of service, part of the British Commonwealth.

For an allied veteran, qualifying service is service during a period of hostilities within or outside the country of enlistment when danger was incurred from hostile forces of the enemy.

In each case, the Naval, Military or Air Forces of Australia must have been engaged in the relevant conflict (see below: "What are the periods of hostilities?").

What do allotment for duty and assignment to warlike operations mean?

Allotment for duty for the purposes of the VEA is a formal process administered by the Department of Defence. It is written confirmation by the Australian Defence Force (ADF) that an ADF member has service in a particular area for a specified period. It can be on an individual basis or as a member of a unit that is allotted. Allotment for duty is not the same as the normal ADF practice of posting units or individuals to different locations.  A person can only be considered to be allotted for duty if they or their unit have been listed in an Instrument of Allotment issued by the Department of Defence.

Warlike service is defined in written determinations (known as Instruments) by the Minister for Defence.  A person's assignment to a warlike operation is recorded in their individual service record.

What are the periods of post-Second World War qualifying service for veterans who served in the ADF?

Location Start date End date Operation
Afghanistan 7 October 2001 ongoing Operation Enduring Freedom
1 December 2001 ongoing Operation Ariki
18 April 2003 5 July 2004 Operation Palate
17 July 2003 ongoing Operation Athena
11 August 2003 ongoing International Security Assistance Force
1 September 2004 ongoing Operation Herrick
27 June 2005 ongoing Operation Palate II
1 January 2015 ongoing Operation Highroad
28 April 2016 ongoing Operation Augury
Cambodia 20 October 1991 7 October 1993 VEA, Schedule 2, Item 12
East Timor 16 September 1999 23 February 2000 Operations Faber and Stabilise
16 September 1999 10 April 2000 Operation Warden
20 February 2000 19 May 2002 Operation Tanager
20 May 2002 17 August 2003 Operation Citadel
Gulf War of ‘90/’91 2 August 1990 9 June 1991 VEA, Schedule 2, Item 10
Iraq 23 February 1991 9 June 1991 VEA, Schedule 2, Item 11
30 June 1991 12 January 2003 Operation Jural
11 August 1991 15 December 1996 Operation Provide Comfort
31 August 1992 12 January 2003 Operations Southern Watch and Bolton
13 January 1993 19 January 1993 VEA, Schedule 2, Item 15
1 January 1997 12 January 2003 Operation Northern Watch
18 March 2003 22 July 2003 Operation Falconer
21 July 2008 ongoing Operation Riverbank
9 August 2014 ongoing Operation Okra * the operational area changes over time
16 July 2003 31 July 2009 Operation Catalyst
1 January 2009 ongoing Operation Kruger
Korea 27 June 1950 19 April 1956 VEA, Schedule 2, Item 1
Kuwait 23 February 1991 9 June 1991 VEA, Schedule 2, Item 11
Lebanon 12 July 2006 14 August 2006 Operation Paladin in Southern Lebanon only
Libya 31 March 2011 31 October 2011 ADF contribution to the NATO no‑fly zone and maritime enforcement operation against Libya
Malaya 29 June 1950 31 August 1957 VEA, Schedule 2, Item 2
Malaya and Singapore 1 September 1957 31 July 1960 VEA, Schedule 2, Item 3
Malay-Thai border 1 August 1960 16 August 1964 VEA, Schedule 2, Item 5
Malaysia – Brunei & Singapore 17 August 1964 14 September 1966 VEA, Schedule 2, Item 7
Middle East Area of Operations (actual area varies according to date of service) 11 October 2001 ongoing Operation Slipper
Namibia 18 February 1989 10 April 1990 VEA, Schedule 2, Item 9
North East Thailand 31 May 1962 27 July 1962 VEA, Schedule 2, Item 3A (Ubon only)
25 June 1965 31 August 1968 VEA, Schedule 2, Item 3B (including Ubon)
Rwanda 25 July 1994 16 January 1996 Operation Tamar
Sabah & Sarawak (now part of Malaysia) & Brunei 8 December 1962 16 August 1964 VEA, Schedule 2, Item 6
Sierra Leone 15 January 2001 28 February 2003 Operation Husky
Somalia 20 October 1992 30 November 1994 VEA, Schedule 2, Item 14
Syria 9 September 2015 ongoing Operation Okra
Vietnam 31 July 1962 11 January 1973 VEA, Schedule 2, Items 4 & 8
12 January 1973 29 April 1975 Australian Embassy Guards and RAAF evacuation personnel in Vietnam
(Former)
Yugoslavia
12 January 1992 24 January 1997 VEA, Schedule 2, Item 13

What does incurred danger mean?

A Commonwealth or allied post-Second World War veteran incurs danger when he or she is at risk or in peril of actual bodily harm or mental injury from hostile forces. Danger is not incurred by merely perceiving or fearing danger. It is an objective test of facts.

Who is a Commonwealth veteran?

A Commonwealth veteran is a person who has rendered continuous full-time service as a member of:

  • the naval, military or air forces;
  • the nursing or auxiliary services of the naval, military or air forces; or
  • the women’s branch of the naval, military or air forces

of a country (other than Australia) that is, or was at the time of service, part of the British Commonwealth.

Who is an allied veteran?

An allied veteran is a person:

  • who has been appointed or enlisted as a member of the defence force of an allied country; and
  • who has rendered continuous full-time service as such a member during a period of hostilities.

When am I not eligible?

You are not eligible if you have ever served:

  • in the forces of a country, or its allies, that was at war with Australia at that particular time; or
  • in any forces that were engaged in hostile operations against Australia at that particular time.

What are the defence forces of allied countries?

The defence force established by an allied country or Government in exile includes:

  • the regular naval, military or air forces; and
  • the nursing or auxiliary services of the regular naval, military or air forces; and
  • the women’s branch of the regular naval, military or air forces.

What are the periods of hostilities for a Commonwealth and allied veteran?

Periods of hostilities for a Commonwealth or allied post-Second World War veteran are as follows:

  • Korea – 27 June 1950 to 19 April 1956;
  • Malaya – 29 June 1950 to 31 August 1957;
  • service in the following operational areas between 31 July 1962 to 11 January 1973:
    • Sabah & Sarawak (now part of Malaysia) & Brunei – 8 December 1962 to 16 August 1964
    • Malay – Thai border – 31 July 1962 to 16 August 1964
    • Malaysia, Brunei & Singapore – 17 August 1964 to 14 September 1966
    • Vietnam – 31 July 1962 to 11 January 1973

*Note: - There are no dates past 11 January 1973 which give qualifying service entitlements to Commonwealth or allied veterans.

How do I confirm qualifying service?

To confirm qualifying service, you will need to complete a form based on the circumstances of your service. If you are:

  • a current or ex-member of the ADF, you will need to complete DVA Form D0506
  • a Commonwealth or allied veteran, you will need to complete DVA Form D0507
  • if you served with the Armed Forces of the Republic of Vietnam, you will also need to complete DVA Form D0507A.

DVA forms are available from your nearest DVA office or the DVA website.

What documents are required?

With your application you should send in certified copies of any documents that support your claim, such as your service records.

What is a certified copy?

A certified copy is a copy of an original document that has been signed and dated by a Justice of the Peace, medical practitioner, person in charge of a Post Office or other authorised person. You can also have copies certified at any DVA office.

More Information

DVA General Enquiries

Phone: 1800 555 254 *

Email: GeneralEnquiries@dva.gov.au

DVA Website: www.dva.gov.au

Factsheet Website: www.dva.gov.au/factsheets

* Calls from mobile phones and pay phones may incur additional charges.

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Disclaimer

The information contained in this Factsheet is general in nature and does not take into account individual circumstances. You should not make important decisions, such as those that affect your financial or lifestyle position on the basis of information contained in this Factsheet. Where you are required to lodge a written claim for a benefit, you must take full responsibility for your decisions prior to the written claim being determined. You should seek confirmation in writing of any oral advice you receive from DVA.

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16 May 2019