Boer War 1899–1902

When Britain went to war against the Boers in South Africa in 1899, some 12,000 Australian troops fought with them, as part of the British Empire. Units were immediately formed within each of the six colonies, which, with Federation in 1901 became the Australian States. After Federation, some Commonwealth units were also recruited.

Over 600 Australians died during the Second Boer War, also known as the Anglo-Boer War or the South African War. Graves in South Africa can be found for many of the Australian casualties, and these graves are maintained with due care [1].

Records for this period and this conflict make precise figures and details difficult to verify. Researching and documenting the Australian war dead from the Boer War is an ongoing process.

On rare occasions it has been possible to prove that the death of a person who had returned to Australia from the Boer War was due to action in the War. In such cases OAWG has marked the veteran's grave with a plaque.

Contact OAWG Need to find out more about a particular person who died during the Boer War? Try asking us.

See further:

 

Three Australians stand over the grave of their comrade Trooper Nathaniel Horsfall of the 5th South Australian Imperial Bushmen who was mortally wounded during the Boer War near Lindley on 24 January 1902.

Three Australians stand over the grave of their comrade Trooper Nathaniel Horsfall of the 5th South Australian Imperial Bushmen who was mortally wounded during the Boer War near Lindley on 24 January 1902.
[ AWM A04945]

 

Footnotes

  1. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission has assumed responsibility from the UK Ministry of Defence for the maintenance of Boer War graves in South Africa on an agency basis. OAWG will work with CWGC to ensure care of the Australian graves.